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Baldwinsville History Mystery: Do you know anything about this picture?

This photo was taken by well-known local photographer Mark H. Chapman. In the late 1940s and early 1950s, our community was in great need of additional schools due to centralization as required by the state. The school pictured was one of the first built. Do you know which one and who the people in the photo are?

Guest column: Local urgent care provides insight on the rising concern of tick-borne illnesses 

Spring is finally here and summer is just around the corner bringing longer days, warmer weather and, unfortunately, tick bites. With a number of tick bite cases already being seen across all of Five Star Urgent Care’s Upstate New York facilities, transmission of tick-borne illnesses such as Lyme and Powassan, are becoming a concern. The best means of handling tick-borne infections is through preventing a tick bite from happening in the first place.

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Salina Seniors recap last six months

We have had a very exciting first six months. We’ve had many speakers, including Debbie Dennis from Lights on the Lake.

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FROM THE LEGISLATURE: Fraud division investigates benefit fraud

Onondaga County’s Department of Social Services – Economic Security is responsible for providing public benefit programs to the citizens of our county. More than 120,000 members of our community will receive some benefit through DSS-ES this year. The benefits available vary greatly, from Temporary Assistance and SNAP (food stamps), to energy assistance (HEAP), day care subsidies, child support and medical insurance (Medicaid). The downturn in the economy has increased the need for these programs dramatically. In fact, 25 percent of Onondaga County’s population qualifies for assistance in some way through DSS-ES.

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NOPL news: Summer Reading Program set to kickoff at NOPL

June 29 marks the start of this year’s Summer Reading Program at NOPL. Kids and teens can sign up at the Brewerton, Cicero and North Syracuse branches, earning prizes each week for reporting on books they’ve read.

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FROM THE ASSEMBLY: Plan to fund private schools with tax credits misses the mark

As we enter the last days of this year’s legislative session, there’s one issue that continues to echo loudly in the halls of the Capitol — the Education Investment Tax Credit (EITC).

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LIVIN' IN LIVERPOOL: You know it’s summer when they’re rockin’ at The Retreat

The popular dinning and drinking establishment on the corner of Vine and First streets hosts Prime Time with soulful singer Paul Valentino, who lives in Liverpool, from 7 to 10 p.m. on Thursday, June 25, and again on July 7.

In the Earth Column: Why biofuels?

For decades, the alternatives to fossil fuel have been nuclear energy, hydroelectric dams, geothermal energy, solar panels, wind power and biofuels. All but the last entry in this list do not release carbon dioxide into the air. They are non-polluting sources of energy. Each of them has its advantages and disadvantages.

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Movie review- This ain’t no Mickey Mouse park – ‘Jurassic World’

For a long time there, I thought the “Jurassic Park” franchise was as extinct as its subject matter. Of course Hollywood will never let an idea completely die. Yet rather than reboot this franchise, it is being redirected, picking up a few years after the storyline of the first three movies.

Guest column- That awkward part of seeing your doctor: Testicular cancer screening

The leading cause of cancer among men age 15 to 34 is testicular cancer. Fortunately, this form of cancer is curable. Even when discovered at the advanced stages, it is nearly 100 percent curable.

Column: The somber topic of the living will

Every medical office visit seems to involve asking whether or not you have a "living will." In my case, the answer, until recently, has been "no." It is a somber topic, but it keeps coming up.

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Historic North Syracuse: Do you know anything about this picture?

Pictured here, an accident at the corner of Church Street and South Bay Road. In the background are the former trolley station and the former trolley car barn, as well as Hamilton’s coal shed, which later burned down. Can you identify the baseball players? Background structures (left to right): former trolley station, former trolley car barn, Hamilton’s coal shed (later burned down). Do you know anything about this photo? Can you identify any of the people or provide an exact date? If you can, email the editor at editor@eaglestarreview.com.

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FROM THE ASSEMBLY: Honoring New York’s women veterans

In June of 1948, President Harry S Truman signed into law the Women’s Armed Services Act and in doing so ensured that women, not just men, would have the opportunity to serve in our nation’s armed services. Sixty-seven years later, female soldiers make up an increasingly large portion of the military — 14 percent of enlisted troops and 16 percent of commissioned officers. While this is a sign of progress, it also means we must take more steps to provide for these servicewomen as they transition back into civilian life.

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NOPL news: One day, three events, three libraries — how will you choose?

If your weekend isn’t already filled with things to do, you’re in luck! NOPL has great events happening at each library this Saturday that you’re not going to want to miss. The annual Friends of the Brewerton Library Book Sale is taking place at NOPL @ Brewerton, NOPL @ Cicero has a LibraryFarm Open House and NOPL @ North Syracuse is hosting the Syracuse Repair Café.

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REMEMBERING CLAY: Influence of brewing on early America and Clay, part III

The community life of New York was further enhanced when Albany was given its own charter in 1688 by New York Gov. Thomas Dongan. Now a city, it was completely separate from the Patroon. It created a council of aldermen who controlled trade, including trade with the natives, as well as the sale of beer and operation of taverns. Those citizens associated with brewing families were given influential positions in the new government. The Dutch were allowed to keep their autonomy and thrived well into the last half of the 1770s.