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CBA Lenten Drive supports Challengers ‘Field of Dreams’ project

This year’s annual CBA Lenten Drive will help raise monies for the Syracuse Challenger’s Baseball Field of Dreams Project. Pictured are Parker Wall, a member of the Syracuse Challenger’s Baseball program and senior Alessandra Carno, of Liverpool.

This year’s annual CBA Lenten Drive will help raise monies for the Syracuse Challenger’s Baseball Field of Dreams Project. Pictured are Parker Wall, a member of the Syracuse Challenger’s Baseball program and senior Alessandra Carno, of Liverpool. Judy Salamone

— Christian Brothers Academy Peer Ministers in Social Justice presented this year’s Lenten Drive to students and faculty prior to an Ash Wednesday prayer service on March 5.

This year’s annual Lenten Drive will support the Syracuse Challenger Baseball program. This program, started eight years ago, is the largest single-district little league organization in the nation, providing opportunities for children with special needs to play baseball. The league has 12 teams and involves more than 220 children, with plans for expansion.

The monies raised by CBA students will help the Challengers build their “Field of Dreams” complex in Carrier Park in DeWitt. The complex will be fully handicapped accessible and open to children of all abilities to play not only baseball, but also lacrosse, football, soccer and softball.

To build awareness to what these children have to endure every day, four students simulated a disability for one day and shared their experiences.

Senior Alex Drescher was in a wheel chair. He said that by the end of the day, his “legs were screaming.”

“It was definitely an experience,” Drescher shared. “It was a lot more difficult than I thought it would be. I learned that you can’t take anything for granted.”

Senior Bella Corieri, who wore earplugs to mimic an individual with impaired hearing, experienced frustration throughout the day.

“I felt lost,” Corieri shared. “I had no awareness of my surroundings. It was scary at times. You need to be thankful for what you have. It was an eye-opening experience.”

Junior Gabby Damico spent the entire day without the use of her thumbs.

“I didn’t think it was going to be a big deal because it was just my thumbs and they are small,” Damico said. “You take for granted the little things, like opening a water bottle. It was very difficult.”

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