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The Common Core kerfuffle continues

Students and teachers in New York will have five more years to adjust to the Common Core standards, as the state's Board of Regents has voted to delay full implementation of graduation requirements until the Class of 2022.

Students and teachers in New York will have five more years to adjust to the Common Core standards, as the state's Board of Regents has voted to delay full implementation of graduation requirements until the Class of 2022.

— The New York State Board of Regents has approved a plan to delay the full implementation of the state’s Common Core graduation requirements until the Class of 2022 — current fourth-graders — instead of the Class of 2017 — current ninth-graders — as had been originally intended.

The shift means that those students currently in fourth grade across the state will have to take and pass five Common Core-aligned exams in order to graduate. Students now in ninth grade will have to take five Common Core exams, but they won’t have to meet what the state calls "college- and career-ready standards" in order to graduate; they’ll just have to pass the tests at a level similar to getting a 65 on current Regents exams.

On an instructional level, the Regents’ move will have little impact, according to local administrators.

“There won’t be a remarkable change. We’re still teaching and using and referring to all of those resources, including the State Education Department’s modules. We’re using those national standards for learning. We won’t be changing that,” said Dr. Maureen Patterson, Liverpool’s assistant superintendent for school improvement. “What we really interpret this as is delaying when students will be held accountable for the Common Core assessments and requirements for graduation. This year’s third-graders, by the time they graduate in 2022, they’ll be taking all Common Core assessments. Right now we only have ELA and math. There’s no science or social studies.”

In fact, both Patterson and North Syracuse Superintendent Annette Speach said they were glad to see the change implemented.

“In a global way, we’re relieved that at least some changes have been made. It’s clear that the commissioner has listened to the concerns voiced throughout the state,” Speach said. “Here in North Syracuse, we’ve kind of looked at Common Core as a positive thing, as movement in the right direction. Our concern was with the way it was rolled out in terms of not having enough time to do it the right way. We’re pleased with the idea that we’re going to have more time to do this in a way that will allow us to rework our curriculum and have proper training.”

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