Quantcast

North Area YMCA day camp encourages daily reading

A young camper reads a book during one of Camp Y-Noah’s reading breaks. The program was incorporated into camp activities to address the loss of reading skills many children suffer during the summer months.

A young camper reads a book during one of Camp Y-Noah’s reading breaks. The program was incorporated into camp activities to address the loss of reading skills many children suffer during the summer months.

— The North Area Family YMCA on Wetzel Road is offering kids the full camp experience: swimming, arts and crafts, field trips… and reading?

This year, the Y’s Camp Y-Noah, which serves kids who have completed kindergarten through sixth grade, has launched a new program to encourage literacy. In addition to traditional camp activities, the roughly 150 campers stop what they’re doing twice a day to read for 15 minutes.

“We are definitely considered experts in fun. Our kids are very, very active,” said camp director Stephanie Rhodes, the North Area YMCA’s school age coordinator. “But we wanted to incorporate this into the program, and it’s had a couple of positives. For one, it allows our kids to decompress for a little bit. When you’re going, going, going for 10 hours, those two 15-minute breaks help them to relax and regroup for the rest of the day.”

Rhodes said the idea came from Y-USA, the overarching organization through which local YMCAs operate, to address the problem of summer learning loss. Children’s reading skills and academic performance typically falter during summer months, but studies show that regular reading during the summer can keep kids’ minds active and ready to achieve when school starts. Rhodes said the North Area site opted into the program to further its efforts to support youth development.

“We first rolled it out on vacation days during the school year, when kids were with us for winter break or spring break,” she said. “This is the first summer we’ve gone all out with it. We’ve seen a lot of success and gotten a lot of good feedback so far.”

Kids can either choose from books available at the YMCA or bring their own from home for the program.

“Our after-school program does a fundraiser each month. In June we held a book drive and a Scholastic book fair, and hundreds of books were donated,” Rhodes said. “So we have a lot of options at every reading level.”

0
Vote on this Story by clicking on the Icon

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment