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Cicero firefighters, police officers receive awards

Cicero Volunteer Fire Department Chief Jon Barrett, left, shows some of the department’s lifesaving equipment to cardiac arrest victim Kurt Wossner and Ann Cross after an awards ceremony Oct. 19. Wossner was saved by similar equipment by the CFD in February.

Cicero Volunteer Fire Department Chief Jon Barrett, left, shows some of the department’s lifesaving equipment to cardiac arrest victim Kurt Wossner and Ann Cross after an awards ceremony Oct. 19. Wossner was saved by similar equipment by the CFD in February. Photo by Sarah Hall.

— Several Cicero Volunteer Fire Department members and Cicero police officers were honored for their lifesaving efforts at an awards ceremony Saturday, Oct. 19.

Cicero Fire Chief Jon Barrett, along with Cicero Police Sergeant John Baldini and Officer James Snell, were honored for their efforts at the scene of a residential structure fire on Wynmoor Drive on Oct. 4, 2012. Five people were injured in the blaze, including one who suffered a life-threatening laceration to his arm. That victim was trapped on the second story of the home, and it was through the efforts of Barrett, Baldini and Snell that he was able to escape the fire.

According to Lisa Bolduc, Liberty Mutual began an award program more than 20 years ago to recognize firefighters who “best represent their communities through courageous acts that demonstrate a firefighter’s selfless spirit.”

Barrett was presented with the Liberty Mutual Fire Mark Award for his efforts at the Wynmoor Drive fire.

“In addition, we would also like to recognize Cicero Police Officer James Snell and Cicero Police Sgt. John Baldini for their heroism and immediate assistance that did save the lives of the injured,” Bolduc said. “Their courageous acts demonstrated selfless spirit.”

Baldini and Snell received Liberty Mutual’s Honorable Mentions for their efforts.

Saturday’s event also recognized those who helped save the life of Kurt Wossner, who suffered a cardiac arrest in February of 2013.

Wossner had suffered a heart attack the week before and was resting at home. His son, Thomas, was home from college caring for him and called 911 when he noticed his father’s erratic breathing. By the time emergency personnel arrived, Wossner, 55, was in full arrest, unconscious and not breathing. But through the efforts of the CFD and NAVAC personnel, including the use of a CFD defibrillator, Wossner was breathing again before being transported to St. Joseph’s Hospital.

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