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COLUMN: Banned Books

“The Hunger Games”

By Suzanne Collins

Scholastic, 2010.

Reasons for being banned: offensive language and violence.

Katniss volunteers for the brutal Hunger Games to keep her younger sister safe. Now the sixteen year-old must battle for survival in a literal fight to the death, all for the amusement of the nation of Panem.

“To Kill a Mockingbird”

By Harper Lee

J. B. Lippincott & Co.,1960.

Reasons for being banned: offensive language and racism.

In this coming of age story, Scout chronicles growing up in a southern community that is divided by the trial of a black man accused of raping a white woman.

“Beloved”

By Toni Morrison

Knopf Doubleday, 2004.

Reasons for being banned: sexually explicit, violence and religious viewpoint.

A story of slavery and the lasting, haunting effect it holds for one woman and her family in Post-Civil War Ohio.

“ttyl”

By Lauren Myracle

Abrams, Harry N., Inc, 2005.

In this 21st century novel, the story is told entirely in instant messages as three friends share their experiences about navigating 10th grade.

“The Golden Compass”

By Philip Pullman

Random House, 2001.

Reasons for being banned: political and religious viewpoints and violence.

"Young Lyra's fantastical journey starts in an alternate Oxford and ends in the far Arctic. As she comes of age in the series, meets new allies, and travels to worlds just a step different from ours, her story weaves some of the most compelling and imaginative threads of innocence, religion, evolution, and existence that I have encountered in juvenile fiction. A must-read for steampunk fans and history buffs looking for a quick but engaging flight of fancy."

Recommended by Erin Cassidy at DeWitt Community Library.

“The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn”

By Mark Twain

Various, 1884/5.

Reasons for being banned: language, racism.

Quite frankly, Twain’s coming of age story is perhaps the most frequently banned books over the years. Huck Finn escapes from an abusive father and travels down the Mississippi River with a runaway slave.

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