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Northern towns pass 2014 budgets

— With little fanfare, the towns of Cicero, Salina and Clay have passed their 2014 budgets. All include minimal tax increases, and none include cuts to programming or resident services.

Read on for specifics for your town budget.

Cicero

The town of Cicero approved its $11,713,303 budget Oct. 23. According to Cicero Supervisor Jim Corl, the total represents about a $230,000 budget-to-budget increase over 2013.

“[The increase] can be attributed to increase in health insurance costs, investments in the codes office, such as additional staff to implement the recommendations of Bernie English in his operational report, replacement of out of date equipment at Town Hall, improvements to our park and investments in our infrastructure,” Corl said.

The budget highlights include the following:

Maintaining the town’s long-term roads program, which sets up a plan to repair Cicero’s deteriorating infrastructure with the aid of the Cornell Roads Program

Funding the five-year vehicle maintenance program for the highway department

Adding a codes enforcement director and three full-time officers

Replacement of the cooling tower at Town Hall

Adding a police officer in 2013 and another in 2014, increasing patrols during peak times

Making improvements to Skyway Park

Eliminating duplication of services at Skyway and Central parks

The budget will utilize $695,000 of the town’s fund balance as well as $900,000 of its capital fund.

The total tax increase amounts to about $0.11 per $1,000 of assessed value, or $11 on a $100,000 house. That’s well within the state’s 2 percent tax cap.

The budget, along with a progress report penned by Corl, is available on the town’s website, ciceronewyork.net.

Clay

Taxpayers in the town of Clay will see a 1.62 percent increase in their property taxes, which amounts to about $4 per household.

Clay approved its budget at its Nov. 6 board meeting. The budget includes very few changes from last year, save for the usual increases in employee and benefit costs.

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