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Public hears update on village stormwater remediation project

Village board announces it will also address some ‘bigger-picture items’ related to the treatment plant and stormwater management

Graphics displayed on a presentation board at the meeting show the flow at the treatment plant and the associated precipitation for April, May, June and July of this year.

Graphics displayed on a presentation board at the meeting show the flow at the treatment plant and the associated precipitation for April, May, June and July of this year. Cheryl Seligman

— “Those kinds of things can really add up to a lot of extra water at the treatment plant, and it’s the worst kind,” he said. “It’s clean water … which goes down to the treatment plant and makes the rest of the sewage a little more difficult to treat.”

At about the same time GHD wanted to disconnect many of the flat roofs from the sanitary sewers in Cazenovia, New York state’s Green Innovation Grant Program began offering funding for municipalities that had projects in certain categories, one of which was disconnecting stormwater from sanitary sewers.

New York state picked Cazenovia’s project up in 2011, leaving the village to pay for only 10 percent of the costs.

A new storm drain has been installed, as well as a new 12-inch underground storm sewer, which will pick up roof drains from many of the buildings that previously sent stormwater to the treatment plant. That water will be redirected to one of two cisterns — concrete boxes designed to allow stored runoff to gradually infiltrate back into the ground.

The first cistern was installed underground adjacent to the parking lot in front of Dave’s Diner on Albany Street, and the second will be installed behind Key Bank.

Carpenter expects the construction to be done this fall, so the treatment plant will have less water flowing in during the first flush of fall storms.

The project may amount to as much as $400,000 in construction, but the village will only pay about $40,000. The village will need to make initial outlays for the costs, but the state will then pay reimbursements. One outlay of about $70,000 has already been made for engineering fees and initial construction costs, Carpenter said, and the state paid the reimbursement in about two weeks.

“We’re hopeful that the project will be one of the small things that you do to try and make sure that your treatment plant doesn’t have to be expanded — very expensive — and can continue to serve the population that we have here,” Carpenter said.

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