Quantcast

Public hears update on village stormwater remediation project

Village board announces it will also address some ‘bigger-picture items’ related to the treatment plant and stormwater management

Graphics displayed on a presentation board at the meeting show the flow at the treatment plant and the associated precipitation for April, May, June and July of this year.

Graphics displayed on a presentation board at the meeting show the flow at the treatment plant and the associated precipitation for April, May, June and July of this year. Cheryl Seligman

— Cazenovia’s village stormwater remediation project is well underway and is expected to be complete by the fall, residents were informed at an public informational meeting last week. In addition, while the public is focused on the treatment plant and stormwater management issues facing the village, especially due to the recent high-volume rains, the village board is looking to fix some of the flaws in its systems by making people more aware — and more accountable — about mistaken or illegal residential sewer pipe connections.

“Our treatment plant is really good at slow and steady, and not so good at big peak flows that come in,” said Project Engineer Tim Carpenter of GHD during the July 23 information session at the village offices. “The water that can come off there can amount to some 44,000 gallons during the first half hour or hour of a rainstorm, and that’s enough to really throw the plant out of whack for a period of time and cause some trouble down there.”

GHD, formerly known as Stearns & Wheler, began looking into the causes of high flows at the Cazenovia wastewater treatment plant beginning in 2008.

“We figured out that there is a fair amount of flat roofs right along Albany Street, to the tune of some 18,000 square feet, or more than a third of an acre,” he said, noting that since they’re connected right to the sewer pipes in the ground, the treatment plant receives huge rushes of water after rainstorms like the ones Cazenovia has seen throughout this summer.

The sewer system is connected to the toilets and showers, while the roofs and drains in the streets are normally connected to the creek or lake, Carpenter said. However, there are cross connections in older buildings along Albany Street, and people also hook their sump pumps up to their sanitary sewer connections when trying to drain flooded basements, he said.

0
Vote on this Story by clicking on the Icon

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment