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Village of Skaneateles holds first meeting in new office

From left: Trustees Jim Lanning, Sue Jones, Mayor Marty Hubbard, Village Clerk Patty Couch and Trustee Marc Angelillo at the first village board meeting to be held in the new Fennell Street village hall.

From left: Trustees Jim Lanning, Sue Jones, Mayor Marty Hubbard, Village Clerk Patty Couch and Trustee Marc Angelillo at the first village board meeting to be held in the new Fennell Street village hall. Cheryl Seligman

The Skaneateles Village Board of Trustees held its first meeting in the new village hall at 26 Fennell St., on Thursday, July 11.

“I’m very proud of the project as it has gone to date,” Mayor Marty Hubbard said, noting that he is equally pleased with the financial end of the project.

As of Sunday, June 30, the contract amounted to $1,297,905 plus $37,044 in change orders, according to data prepared by Director of Municipal Operations Bob Lotkowictz. The contract for general construction made up the bulk of the total amount, with a contract amount of $722,000 and change order amount of $12,075. The electrical contract saw the largest percent change — 14.6 percent — with a contract amount of $143,200 and a change order amount of $20,902.

Lotkowictz said he anticipates the remainder of the project lasting four to six weeks.

During committee reports, police Chief Lloyd Perkins reported on how officers respond when traffic signals stop working during a power outage.

“The officers are told to prioritize,” Perkins said. “It has to do with whether it’s daylight, dark, are they all out, just one of them out, is it going to be an extended period of time. … Usually when there’s a power outage we’re getting numerous alarms at the same time.”

If the outage is expected to last an extended amount of time, the police department works to get portable stop signs to the intersections, which takes about 20 to 30 minutes to do in a best-case scenario, he said.

“The [traffic light] on the hill is priority because of the speeds approaching the village, and it’s a four-way intersection,” Perkins added.

“We don’t like to jump into an intersection and start directing traffic,” he continued, “because once you do that — it’s a state highway, state-owned traffic lights, state-owned crosswalks — once we move into that intersection and start directing traffic, we’re going to assume all of the liability for what happens at that intersection.”

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