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Colleagues remember C-NS teacher who died of lymphoma

Marty Campbell, 29, died of lymphoma on May 17. The Cicero-North Syracuse High School teacher was remembered by colleagues and students as kind, caring and dedicated.

Marty Campbell, 29, died of lymphoma on May 17. The Cicero-North Syracuse High School teacher was remembered by colleagues and students as kind, caring and dedicated.

— Marty Campbell was the kind of guy everyone loved.

“He was the kind of person who brought light into whatever space he was in with his warmth, his smile and his kindness,” said Lisa Goldberg, who taught in the social science department with Campbell at Cicero-North Syracuse High School. “Marty was like the 'universal donor' in that there was some way he could connect with almost anyone. I wish you could have known him — he would have dazzled you.”

Campbell, 29, died May 17 from lymphoma, a diagnosis he received last December. He is survived by his fiancé, Jayson Steere; his father, James (Doris) Campbell of Garnerville, NY; his mother, Mary Leahy of Stony Point, NY; two brothers, James W. Campbell Jr. of Stony Point, NY and Brian T. (Maria) Campbell of Fort Montgomery, NY; a stepbrother, Jeff Abrams of Stony Point, NY; a stepsister, Cathy (Thomas) Cooney of Point Pleasant, NJ and numerous aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins.

Campbell taught global studies and sociology at C-NS for six years, including the school’s Syracuse University Project Advance (SUPA) Sociology class, for which students could get college credit. Campbell had to be trained specially by SU for the class and lobbied hard to bring it to C-NS. He also served as co-advisor to the Class of 2012, a class that has already lost two of its graduating seniors —Taylor Fleming, who died in a car accident in December, and Miranda Merola, who died unexpectedly at home in February of 2010 during her sophomore year.

“Marty was an energetic and engaging teacher,” said C-NS Interim Principal Melissa Julian. “When I observed him earlier in the school year, much like his students, I found myself immersed in the material and the content which isn't always easy for students to grasp when working with the past. More importantly, though, was Marty's willingness to listen and respect his students. He treated them as adults and was always willing to give up his time to help them however he could.”

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