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Cazenovia Forum presents Anne Kreamer

Author Anne Kreamer speaks to the crowd of about 120 area residents on May 4 at Catherine Cummings Theater.  Kreamer’s latest book, “It’s Always Personal: Emotion in the New Workplace,” discusses different approaches to conflict in the workplace.

Author Anne Kreamer speaks to the crowd of about 120 area residents on May 4 at Catherine Cummings Theater. Kreamer’s latest book, “It’s Always Personal: Emotion in the New Workplace,” discusses different approaches to conflict in the workplace.

— Nearly 120 people listened intently to the elegant, gray-haired woman standing on the stage at the latest Cazenovia Forum lecture.

Acclaimed author Anne Kreamer spoke softly to audience members, regaling them with a story about the incident that caused her to quit her high-profile job in media and take a different approach to life.

“I was in my office with a team of people celebrating the successful completion of 18 months of negotiations with Sony Music to distribute Nickelodeon video and audio products,” Kreamer said. “But, I pick up the phone and he [Sumner Redstone, chairman of Viacom Inc. and the CBS Corporation] started to scream at me. He was shrieking … The deal failed to move the Viacom stock price.”

Kreamer, author of “It’s Always Personal: Emotion in the New Workplace,” says the event was “embarrassing,” and festered in her mind for a couple of years.

The company she had joined was changing directions and seemed to strive less to put out quality products than to raise stock prices to $55 a share.

That revelation, combined with her own changing personal goals, made the decision to quit her job easy. Today, she is the author of several books and is presently writing another.

Kreamer was at the Catherine Cummings Theatre on Friday, May 4 for the second of four Cazenovia Forum events this year.

Among the several topics she covered were workplace emotions, the differences between men and women and the similarities between workers of varying ranks.

She spoke about the emotional pre-dispositions of men and women on the job. For instance, physiology can affect perception. Kreamer pointed out that the tear ducts of women are much smaller than that of men.

She explained that as a result, if faced with the same negative situation, women would look much more shaken up by the event than their male counterparts, even if they weren’t.

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