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Caz Action: ‘This is here’

Gary Bulinski, left, of the Drug Traffic Safety Inc. discusses the dangers of drugs in the Central New York area with Investigator Mike Burgess, right, of Oneida County Drug Enforcement during the May 1 event sponsored by The Drug Free Task Force of Madison County’s Promise and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

Gary Bulinski, left, of the Drug Traffic Safety Inc. discusses the dangers of drugs in the Central New York area with Investigator Mike Burgess, right, of Oneida County Drug Enforcement during the May 1 event sponsored by The Drug Free Task Force of Madison County’s Promise and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

Law enforcement “Being The Wall”

The Drug Free Task Force of Madison County’s Promise and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) sponsored “This Is Here” on May 1.

Featured speaker, Gary Bulinski of the Drug Traffic Safety, Inc. gave an incredibly informative presentation to assist parents, youth leaders, case workers, and other adults. The prevention message was to be able to evaluate and recognize the signs of substance abuse early.

Parents looking for information

Parents attending learned specifics about eyelid tremors, pupil dilation, balance, coordination, smells, cover-up techniques and more. With photos and demonstrations, the parents and attendees felt able to critically evaluate for substance abuse. With early detection, the harm can often be mineralized.

Attendees were able to see and touch empty current packaging of drugs. More importantly, the potency of today’s drugs was compared to that of parents of today’s teens. Synthetic drugs can be up to 35 percent more potent than 25 years ago.

This potentially means more danger and more damage. With a focus on protecting youth, informed parents can confidently say that their child can not compare what is “out there” today with the substances their parents or parent’s friends might have observed or experienced in their youth.

What about meth labs?

Investigator Mike Burgess of the Oneida County Drug Enforcement Task Force also, gave an informative presentation. The primary message was: don’t touch, don’t smell and do call your local police if you see anything suspicious.

What does a meth lab look like? At first glance it looks like a pile of garbage. Soda bottles, tubes coming out of them, fuel canisters, cans and stoppers are all tell tail signs. If the bottle has a white residue in it, it is probably mineralized. If you see a garbage bag thrown on a road side, don’t move it and stay away from it. This drug is extremely addictive and destructive.

The task force has been very diligent at locating meth labs in the county. They have an excellent track record for finding and eliminating meth labs. Through their efforts to keep citizens safe, they are “Being The Wall” in Oneida County.

In Cazenovia call: 911 in the event of an emergency, or the Madison County Dispatcher at 366-2311.

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