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Students, staff save more than 200 lives

Teacher Brian Sevey taught calculus to students Zach Ross and Nate Scuderi while he gave blood. (He was sitting up because he was giving double red cells). "They normally come down to see me fifth period, and when I told them I would be giving blood, they said 'we'll come down there'," Sevey explained. Red Cross nurse Eleanor Luera said she has never seen a teacher teaching while giving blood, "but I'm ok with it," she quipped. "It keeps his mind off it."

Teacher Brian Sevey taught calculus to students Zach Ross and Nate Scuderi while he gave blood. (He was sitting up because he was giving double red cells). "They normally come down to see me fifth period, and when I told them I would be giving blood, they said 'we'll come down there'," Sevey explained. Red Cross nurse Eleanor Luera said she has never seen a teacher teaching while giving blood, "but I'm ok with it," she quipped. "It keeps his mind off it."

Students and staff at Skaneateles High School donated 74 pints of blood Thursday, March 1, at the American Red Cross Blood drive held in the gym. Students were excited to learn they had helped 222 people — maybe even saved 222 lives — by rolling up their sleeves and giving the gift of life.

The goal for the day set by the Red Cross was 54 pints.

Representatives of the American Red Cross told students that each blood donor may help save the lives of three people, as the blood is divided into red cells, plasma and platelets.

One of the main goals of the high school blood drive is to develop life-long donors. Statistics show that once someone gives, they are likely to keep giving. There were plenty of first time donors — 45! — Thursday, according to Robert Cotter of the American Red Cross. Students swallowed their fear and took their turns on cots throughout the day.

Tim Ray, operation supervisor with the Red Cross, said the drive went very well. “Your drive was very well organized. The kids were very well behaved. It was one of the best schools I’ve been to in a very long time,” Ray said as he packed up after the drive.

The blood drive is sponsored by the high school’s Interact Club. Karen Price, Interact Club advisor, agreed the drive went exceptionally well. She credited the “great custodial help, the supportive staff and our crew of wonderful volunteers.”

Price praised the Interact Club leaders who organized the event and worked it throughout the day, along with a core of other student volunteers.

“And of course it is all about the donors,” she said. “We are lucky to have so many students and staff members who are willing to step forward.”

Lori Ruhlman is the Skaneateles CSD public information officer.

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