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Nonprofit renovates veteran’s Bridgeport home

Sgt. Jason Moseley, ret., right, speaks before a crowd during a ceremony celebrating the completion of renovations to his home in Bridgeport. Watching is Paul Hoffecker, founder and CEO of Renovating Hope, the nonprofit that oversaw the renovations.

Sgt. Jason Moseley, ret., right, speaks before a crowd during a ceremony celebrating the completion of renovations to his home in Bridgeport. Watching is Paul Hoffecker, founder and CEO of Renovating Hope, the nonprofit that oversaw the renovations. Photo by Sarah Hall.

— Sometimes, even heroes need to ask for help.

Jason Moseley’s home in Bridgeport was in shambles, and Moseley, an Iraqi War veteran and Purple Heart recipient, was in no shape to fix it up. So he turned to RenovatingHope, a nonprofit that thanks American soldiers for their sacrifices by fixing up their homes at no cost.

Moseley won a Purple Heart after his second tour in Iraq. The Georgia native first enlisted in the army in January 2005 in his late teens, prompted by his uncles’ service as well as the grim job market. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment of the 10th Mountain Division at Fort Drum in Watertown. Later that year, he was deployed to Baghdad. On a mission through the city, his unit witnessed its truck commander’s Humvee strike an explosive device. The truck commander was killed. Moseley and his unit were then ordered to “collect his body parts and the debris of the Humvee,” according to a biography provided by Moseley’s Wounded Warrior transition officer, Cynthia Cuppernell. “As you can imagine, the experience was emotionally scarring and haunts him today.”

Moseley returned home to his fiancée, Erinn Cox, and his two children briefly, but soon received orders for a second deployment, this time to Kirkuk. Five months into that tour, on Nov. 24, 2007, while on patrol, Moseley’s unit was attacked. Moseley was injured by an incoming enemy mortar round. The force of the mortar blast threw Jason five feet into the air, slamming him into a Humvee. Jason suffered a traumatic brain injury, a bilateral eye injury and injured his right knee and right shoulder. He was later diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder. He was flown to Germany for treatment then Air Force One took Jason and others to Washington, D.C. for further treatment. At last, he was flown to Fort Drum’s Wounded Warrior Treatment Program, where he eventually received a medical discharge from the army.

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