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CPF offers interpretive bike loops

The Stone Church on Stearns Road, which was once the residence of local artist Merrill Bailey, is featured on one of the two bike loops offered by CPF in July. Temporary signage informs visitors of the area and its surroundings.

The Stone Church on Stearns Road, which was once the residence of local artist Merrill Bailey, is featured on one of the two bike loops offered by CPF in July. Temporary signage informs visitors of the area and its surroundings. Judy Gianforte

— A trip along the back roads of Cazenovia is a visual treat. Winding through a natural landscape of rolling hills and glacial features, the roads yield ever-changing views of land use — a woodland here, cultivated field there.

The roadsides tell a story of people moving into and around the town, building houses and mills, traveling by road and train.

As part of its summer Walks ‘N Talks series, the Cazenovia Preservation Foundation is offering two interpreted bike loops through this cultural landscape.

Each loop provides a starting place for residents to park and unload their bikes. From there, riders will follow the route to find seven roadside signs that help them see more of, and better understand, the landscape through which they will pass.

Cars can also follow the route and pull over at the signs, which will be in place for the month of July.

CPF’s mission is “to protect historic, agricultural and natural resources in and around Cazenovia for the benefit of the community.” The interpreted sites along these routes present all these resources as the cultural heritage of the area. CPF is a membership-supported not-for-profit organization.

“In addition to our summer walks series, CPF maintains over 12 miles of public trails in Cazenovia and protects the conservation values of almost 2,000 acres in the area through easements and CPF ownership,” said CPF Conservation Manager Judy Gianforte.

Maps of the bike routes with mileage and descriptions are available on the CPF website at cazpreservation.org.

Paper copies can also be found at the Cazenovia Public Library and Dave’s Diner. After roadside signage is removed at the end of July, the maps and the information on each cultural waypoint will remain posted on the CPF website.

CPF encourages the posting of stories and photos from the two loops or from explorations of other cultural back road treasures on its Facebook page.

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