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Eagle Star-Review 2011: The Year in Review

One of the biggest stories this year was the murder of a newborn baby in January. The child's mother, Nicole DeJaynes, was charged with murder in the girl's death. Police held a funeral for the baby, whom they named Isabella Marie.

One of the biggest stories this year was the murder of a newborn baby in January. The child's mother, Nicole DeJaynes, was charged with murder in the girl's death. Police held a funeral for the baby, whom they named Isabella Marie.

It’s gone, but it’s not forgotten.

Let’s take a moment and remember some of the stories that made headlines in your community in 2011:

January

A dead baby was discov¬ered in a dumpster outside the Pearl Street Apart¬ments, a block south of the railroad tracks in the village of Liverpool at about 10:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 6. Her mother, Nicole DeJaynes, was charged with murder in the infant’s death.

Liverpool Village Police held a funeral for the child, whom they named Isabella Marie.

A grand jury indicted DeJaynes on charges of first- and second-degree murder on Nov. 17. She faces 25 years to life in prison if convicted. She remains held without bail at the Corbett Justice Center in Syracuse.

The village of North Syracuse was forced to shut down its post office after 50 years. The order came from the U.S. Postal Service due to steep budget cuts.

“It’s very sad,” said then-Mayor Diane Browning. “This post office has been the centerpiece of our village for some time. A lot of senior citizens come in here because it’s easy to walk to. With the post office and the different businesses, it has been a walkable village for many.”

February

On Feb. 3, the leader¬ship of United Liverpool Faculty Association, the union representing over 1,000 teachers, teaching assistants, teacher aides and other staff in the Liverpool Central School district, de¬termined that they would not vote on a proposal to open member’s contracts and freeze wages for the 2011-2012 school year.

“We need to have fair compensation for what we do because we’re profes¬sionals,” said Pattie Miller, president of ULFA. “I know the community is frus¬trated, but we also need to respect our own profes¬sionalism and to keep our salaries at a place where we’re professionally com¬pensated.”

Steven Pieper pleaded guilty to charges of second-degree murder in the death of Jenni-Lyn Watson on Feb. 21. Pieper, 21, admitted to strangling the 20-year-old Mercyhurst College student Nov. 19, 2010 at her home when she refused to get back together with him, then dumping her body at Clay Central Park. He is currently serving 23 years to life in prison.

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