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Caz College presents annual Student Juried Exhibition

Amanda Brezicky, a Cazenovia College junior majoring in studio art, demonstrates her drawing machine,“Twinelliptic Pendulum,” at the 2012 Student Juried Exhibition in the Art Gallery of Reisman Hall on Feb. 20.

Amanda Brezicky, a Cazenovia College junior majoring in studio art, demonstrates her drawing machine,“Twinelliptic Pendulum,” at the 2012 Student Juried Exhibition in the Art Gallery of Reisman Hall on Feb. 20. Paul Shepard

— Stephanie Joyce, a junior at Cazenovia College, contributed a collection of very whimsical inkjet digital prints entitled “We Are All Animals.” They consisted of human bodies with various animal heads superimposed, including that of a tiger, penguin, camel and a cow. One is reminded somewhat of Egyptian gods, though the setting and clothes give them a modern twist.

Lauren Berkalow, a studio art sophomore, offered performance, documentation and props from a piece entitled “Pan,” consisting of a digital photo, deer hide, antlers and a rubber “hoof” glove.

Ben Schreibman, a photography student, contributed two massive photographs taken in Zuccotti Park in New York City, documenting the Occupy Movement. He said he was disappointed that “they got the titles wrong.” While his works are labeled “Cold Stone” and “Occupy Syracuse,” respectively in the show, they are in fact titled “Rage” and “Throw Me Some Crumbs,” Schreibman said.

Nicole Foster, a visual communications sophomore, contributed an eye-catching print entitled “Students Must Occupy Together.” “The class assignment involved ‘awareness’ on any topic,” she said. Foster recently submitted her work to OccupyDesign.org, a site whose purpose is “building a visual language for the 99 percent,” according to the organization’s website. The poster advertises Occupytogether.com, a site involved with the Occupy Movement and “the 99 percent,” with whom Foster identifies.

One highlight of the evening was when Amanda Brezicky, a studio art junior, performed a piece entitled “Calculus From Another Plane.” It involved a drawing-machine she invented, called a “twinelliptic pendulum.”

First, a sheet of paper is fixed to a tray. Then a paintbrush is dipped into one of several vials of colored paint, after which it is fixed to a kind of claw. The claw is kept stationary while the operator (with a swift kick) sets a pendulum into motion, which moves the tray around to cause an abstract image to be painted.

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