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Froio's first 100: Jordan-Elbridge Superintendent helps district rebuild

Froio took the helm of the J-E Central School District amid one of the biggest scandals in the district’s deeply-rooted history. One hundred days into the school year, Froio is helping J-E rebuild.

Froio took the helm of the J-E Central School District amid one of the biggest scandals in the district’s deeply-rooted history. One hundred days into the school year, Froio is helping J-E rebuild. Photo by Amanda Seef.

— Jordan-Elbridge Superintendent James Froio was at a basketball game last week when the drumline performed at half-time. Previously cut from the budget, the funds for the percussive program were reinstated in August.

“I turned to my wife and I said, ‘Wow.’ Had we not made that decision in August, none of this would have happened,” Froio said. “There are some things you do [as superintendent], you don’t realize what an impact it really makes at the time you make the decision.”

Froio took the helm of the J-E Central School District amid one of the biggest scandals in the district’s deeply-rooted history. One hundred days into the school year, Froio is helping J-E rebuild.

“The future for the district is very bright,” he said. “We hit a low spot, but I think now it’s going to keep getting better and better.”

He came to Jordan-Elbridge after serving as executive principal at Cicero-North Syracuse High School, an administrative position that left him in charge of three other principals. The high school, alone, housed 2,400 students at C-NS. Jordan-Elbridge has about 1,500 students district-wide.

“When all of the news broke about J-E in the newspaper [in the spring], I remember looking at a friend of mine and saying, ‘I’m going to apply there to be the superintendent,’” Froio said. Fast forward to July 1, and Froio made that a reality. He came into the district at a time when many residents were unhappy with the district’s decisions. The district was, and still is, entangled in numerous lawsuits regarding the board of education and administrative decisions.

“I think, obviously, that the litigation was on everyone’s mind — the press, their attention was focused on it,” Froio said. “My job was to refocus the district on the students and how we can best move the district forward. The litigation is my burden, that shouldn’t be everyone’s burden.”

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