Quantcast

Seneca Family Dental: Serving CNY for 30 years

CLOCKWISE FROM FRONT LEFT: Seneca Family Dental’s Dr. Dabir, Harini Dabir, Donna Konsp, Mary Schiavone and Bela Patel are ready to meet your dental needs.

CLOCKWISE FROM FRONT LEFT: Seneca Family Dental’s Dr. Dabir, Harini Dabir, Donna Konsp, Mary Schiavone and Bela Patel are ready to meet your dental needs.

Seneca Family Dental is celebrating its 30th year of providing dental health care in Central New York. The office, which was originally 500 square feet, has grown to 2,200 square feet.

“Some of our office highlights our excellent dental health care with the latest equipment such as digital X-rays, which cuts radiation exposure by almost 90-percent,” said Dr. Dabir. “We have an excellent hygiene department. We provide total dental health care for our patients including white fillings, bleaching, dentures, root canal treatments, gum treatments, minor orthodontic treatment, crowns, bridges, implants and extractions as well as major and minor surgical procedures. Prompt emergency dental care is also provided.”

In his suite of offices, Dabir addresses life-long dental needs, explaining that good dental health care begins at age 2.

“By 2 years of age,” Dabir said, “baby teeth are all in, and that’s time to get a child used to the dentist’s office.”

Dabir enjoys working with children, and his special way with youngsters is “to talk with them in their language, to calm and reassure them.”

“I give them a small mirror,” Dabir said, “so they can watch and see that there are no hidden secrets.”

Contrary to what some young parents believe, the toddler state is not too early to begin a six-month checkup schedule.

“They chew, they eat, they can get tooth decay,” Dabir said. “But, don’t wait until a tooth hurts and it is too late to do a simple procedure.”

Dabir explains to parents that regular checkups can catch small cavities when they are easier to treat.

Baby bottle syndrome, according to Dabir, is a common cause of baby tooth decay.

“This happens,” Dabir explained. “When a baby goes to sleep with a bottle of juice or milk held in his mouth. Both juice and milk have sugar. I tell young mothers to remove the bottle and wipe the teeth with a wet gauze pad. Or, replace the milk or juice in the feeding bottle with water, at least while bedtime feeding.”

0
Vote on this Story by clicking on the Icon

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment