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Mattydale American Legion Post 1832 commemorates Pearl Harbor anniversary

Members of the Mattydale American Legion and VFW posts pay tribute to those lost at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7. Twenty-four hundred and two Americans died in the Japanese surprise attack in 1941.

Members of the Mattydale American Legion and VFW posts pay tribute to those lost at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7. Twenty-four hundred and two Americans died in the Japanese surprise attack in 1941. Matthew Liptak

— Just over 20 people met on a cold Friday morning outside American Legion Post 1832 in Mattydale to commemorate what happened in Pearl Harbor in 1941 on Dec. 7. A lone car horn on Route 11 sounded in tribute to the ceremony happening by the side of the road in front of the Stars and Stripes.

More than 2,400 Americans died during the attack by the Japanese in Hawaii that Sunday morning just over seven decades ago. Though no World War II veterans were on hand to remember, members of the Mattydale American Legion and VFW paid respect to the sacrifice made by those who were there in Pearl Harbor.

The commander of the American Legion post, George Martin, made a short speech:

“Fellow members, auxiliary members, sons: Seventy-one years ago, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt made the statement 'a day that will live in infamy.' We are here to pay homage to all the service members who were in Pearl Harbor on the day of the attack be they Army, Navy, Marines...the Army Air Corps. There are many service members still lying in the ships that were sunk. Sometime during today spend a quiet moment to remember that all gave some, while some gave all. God bless the United States of America.”

The ceremony also included the playing of “Taps” and the firing of a gun salute.

A member at the VFW said they hadn't seen a WWII vet show up at their post in over a year, and the American Legion post has very few members who remember that day personally.

Beverly Martin of Lyncourt is the sister-in-law to George, the commander, and an auxiliary member of the American Legion. She wasn't around when Pearl Harbor happened but her late father, Raymond H. Brown, a combat veteran of WWI, was. She remembers the impact that day had on him.

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