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Schoolhouse Farms prepares for third year of Community Supported Agriculture program

Schoolhouse Farms, on Rose Hill Road in Borodino, is now beginning its third year offering a Community Supported Agriculture program in which community members pay an annual membership fee to the farm and in return receive a weekly share of the harvest.

Schoolhouse Farms, on Rose Hill Road in Borodino, is now beginning its third year offering a Community Supported Agriculture program in which community members pay an annual membership fee to the farm and in return receive a weekly share of the harvest.

— The Malcolms decided to become a CSA farm in 2010 as a way to help make the farm viable in a struggling economy and as a result of the downsizing of the company Richard worked for. For 10 years before that, Schoolhouse Farms was more of a hobby for Rebecca who loved farming and selling the produce at her own farmside stand and at area Farmers’ Markets.

“Our dream was to do this together, and Richard liked to say, ‘Yeah I’ll quit my job someday and farm with,” Rebecca said.

“Oh what dreams may come!” Richard added with a smile and a laugh.

So as Richard transitioned between jobs, he helped Rebecca with the farming. The farm — which is a pesticide-free, organic microfarm — expanded in size and scope from five to 15 acres, and the Malcolms started offering the CSA program. Schoolhouse Farms now offers more than 80 varieties of produce, and are best known for their heirloom tomatoes, beans and summer squash. As their farm has expanded so has their popularity, customer base and CSA participants.

“We had the pleasure, gustatory and otherwise, of getting fresh, fresh, organically produced greens, tomatoes, potatoes, herbs, etc. each week from the folks at Schoolhouse Farms in Borodino. Not only was the produce exceptional but Becky Muir included a weekly insert that explained the more exotic varieties and how to prepare them,” said Ann Ferro, of Marcellus, who participated in the CSA program last year. “We ate well. We felt particularly good about our decision to purchase our share because we believe that supporting local agriculture is not only good for the economy, it contributes to better health and a cleaner environment. If there was any drawback, and I hardly think that it is, but I had a hard time finding ways to use all of the lovely, dark green and oh so fragrant basil that we received. Can't wait for this year's season to begin.”

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