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Jazz’N Caz to leave residents ‘swingin’ on a star!’

Tenth annual weekend-long festival to honor Jimmy Van Heusen

HARD AT WORK: Composer Jimmy Van Heusen with the tools of his trade, circa 1950. This year’s Jazz’N Caz festival will commemorate Van Heusen’s extensive career with numerous performances.

HARD AT WORK: Composer Jimmy Van Heusen with the tools of his trade, circa 1950. This year’s Jazz’N Caz festival will commemorate Van Heusen’s extensive career with numerous performances.

“The student body loved the song, but the teachers thought otherwise,” said Sylvia Needel, a writer for the Cazenovia College Office of Communications. Needel researched Van Heusen’s life and learned the story behind his pseudonym.

About 1928, when Babcock worked as a radio disc jockey, his friend Ralph Harris helped him create a stage name so that Chet’s father, a Syracuse building contractor, wouldn’t learn about his radio program.

Ralph glanced out a Hotel Syracuse window and saw a billboard advertising Van Heusen collars. Great last name! “Well, how about my first name?” Chet asked. Ralph’s favorite cousin was named James, and the rest is pop music history.

Following multiple expulsions from Central High, Jimmy’s staunch Methodist parents sent him to Cazenovia Seminary in 1928 and’29, but he remained focused on music.

Williams Hall piano

A Cazenovia classmate, Maurice Golden, who later joined the college’s board of trustees, said Van Heusen spent plenty of time at the piano in the Lyceum fraternity meeting room in Williams Hall. “Many of his most famous songs were developed from ideas that had their beginning right there,” Golden said.

Van Heusen broke into the big time in 1938 by collaborating with bandleader Jimmy Dorsey on a song called “It’s the Dreamer in Me.” The hits flowed as he wrote for stage and screen, composing melodies for tunes such as “Polka Dots and Moonbeams,” “It Could Happen to You,” “Personality” and “My Kind of Town.”

In 1963, as co-chair of the Cazenovia College Alumni Fund Drive, Van Heusen lent his song, “High Hopes,” to the campaign, with lyrics supplied by Development Director Ralph Larsen vocalized by Bing Crosby. The song was pressed as a 45 RPM record and sent to alumni, who responded enthusiastically with donations.

Civic Center’s 1986 tribute

In January 1986, 73 years after his birth, Van Heusen was honored in Syracuse with an SRO variety show culminating the Civic Center’s 10th Anniversary Celebration Week.

Among the entertainers who flew here to perform were Tony Bennett, Maxine Sullivan, Sammy Cahn, Margaret Whiting, Jack Jones and emcee Tony Randall.

Van Heusen died on Feb. 6, 1990, in Rancho Mirage, Calif., at age 77. His headstone is engraved with the title of his 1944 Academy Award-winning song, “Swinging on a Star.”

Jazz’N Caz is free and open to the public. A $10 donation is suggested. For additional information, contact festival director Colleen Prossner at 655-7238.

Russ Tarby is a freelance writer for Eagle Newspapers. He can be reached at russtarby@netscape.net.

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