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Cazenovians shop locally Black Friday

Area merchants experience increased sales after Thanksgiving

MaryAnn McCarthy, right, checks out the Black Friday bargains The Key has to offer on Nov. 25. A resident of the Hudson Valley, she said she makes the seasonal trip to visit relatives, and shop.

MaryAnn McCarthy, right, checks out the Black Friday bargains The Key has to offer on Nov. 25. A resident of the Hudson Valley, she said she makes the seasonal trip to visit relatives, and shop. Photo by Pierce Smith.

— Last weekend officially began the holiday shopping season, and not only national corporations saw profits. In Cazenovia, local merchants saw increased sales due to “Black Friday,” as well as “Small Business Saturday.”

“I knew we would be busy today,” said Karen Eldridge, owner of Isabella, on Black Friday. “I think there has been a lot more emphasis on [shopping locally] and educating customers lately. Everyone who lives here loves this community. We should all be supporting it as much as we can, any way we can.”

Black Friday is a shopping holiday held each year on the day after Thanksgiving. This year, it fell on Nov. 25. Retailers nationwide offer discounts to anxious shoppers, and many stores open in the early morning hours to accommodate bargain-hunters. Black Friday is traditionally regarded as the busiest shopping day of the year.

Small Business Saturday is an American shopping holiday held on the Saturday after Thanksgiving. Created by the financial corporation American Express last year, consumers are encouraged to patronize their local small businesses. Alternatively, the Monday following Thanksgiving, known as “Cyber Monday” since 2005, encourages shoppers to peruse online stores.

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Two young shoppers make their way down Albany Street, loot in hand, Nov. 25. Numerous Cazenovia shops experienced success this past weekend, with “Black Friday” and “Small Business Saturday” enticing consumers to spend money, locally.

While deep discounts can be found online, many forgo the virtual route when shopping. The inability to try on garments, the absence of human contact and the lack of sales tax revenue returned to one’s own area are just a few reasons for the resurgence in shopping locally.

“There are a lot of families in town this time of year. It’s wonderful,” said Laurie Hunt, owner of Lillie Bean. “They all come out and walk around together, saying hello to their friends in town. It’s almost like a family reunion atmosphere.”

This year, Black Friday and Shop Local Saturday boasted (unseasonably) warm temperatures and abundant sunshine, beckoning consumers out of their food-comas and recliners.

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