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Village board may spend $500,000 for water treatment plant

Rotational Biological Contactors, or RBCs — cost $400,000 to $600,000 each, but are essential to the operations of the wastewater treatment plant. RBCs are 26-feet-long by 12-feet-wide cylinder-shaped pieces of equipment, made mostly of plastic, that continually rotate, passing waste water through the liners, thereby removing anaerobic bacteria (organic materials and ammonia) out of the water.

Rotational Biological Contactors, or RBCs — cost $400,000 to $600,000 each, but are essential to the operations of the wastewater treatment plant. RBCs are 26-feet-long by 12-feet-wide cylinder-shaped pieces of equipment, made mostly of plastic, that continually rotate, passing waste water through the liners, thereby removing anaerobic bacteria (organic materials and ammonia) out of the water. Photo by Jason Emerson.

— The arbitrator’s decision, issued on Oct. 28, concluded that the village did not violate the collective bargaining agreement because the product being offered to employees “remains substantially similar.”

The village and the union have been negotiating a new collective bargaining agreement since May, when the previous agreement expired. One sticking point was the health insurance issue, but now, with the arbitrator’s decision, it is hoped an agreement may come in the “near future,” according to Angellilo.

—The board is considering changing the payment kiosks in the municipal parking lot to accepting credit cards, which it currently does not. The board also is giving “serious consideration” to upgrading the Fennell Street parking lot to be repaved and remarked for spaces, and also to include a mixture of paid and non-paid parking similar to the municipal lot.

—The trustees approved a resolution to verify that upcoming village elections for two town board seats will be held on March 20, 2012, and notices to that effect will be published in the local newspapers.

—Trustee Sue Jones encouraged all members of the town board to consider donating their time to volunteer for the Salvation Army as a red donation kettle bell ringer during the annual Dickens Christmas celebration downtown. “It might make a statement to the community if we all do it,” Jones said. Bell-ringing shifts this year are scheduled to last for one hour each. Last year, the Salvation Army raised $4,380 through its Skaneateles Red Kettle Campaign.

Jason Emerson is editor of the Skaneateles Press. He can be reached at editor@skaneatelespress.com.

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