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Butterfly Garden of Hope in Liverpool path gains more memorial bricks

The Hope for Bereaved Butterfly Garden’s pathway of memorial bricks recently saw an expansion as an additional 1,000 bricks were added thanks to a donation from Michael Grimm Landscaping and Tree Services.

The Hope for Bereaved Butterfly Garden’s pathway of memorial bricks recently saw an expansion as an additional 1,000 bricks were added thanks to a donation from Michael Grimm Landscaping and Tree Services. Alyssa Fleck

— More than 2,000 little pieces of hope guide community members through the Hope for Bereaved Butterfly Garden on the Onondaga Lake Parkway. But after 18 years of existence, 2,000 little pieces were no longer enough.

Therese Schoeneck founded Hope for Bereaved, Inc., an organization that offers support to people whose loved ones have died, after her daughter died in a car accident in 1978. The garden, which was meant to be a gift to the community, has a brick path and benches where the bereaved are able to engrave messages to those who have died.

“There’s a lot of stories that go with both the brick and the benches,” Schoeneck said. “It’s in the shape of a butterfly because it means hope, and everyone needs hope in their lives – not just the bereaved.”

Schoeneck, however, said the path had run out of blank bricks, and an extension was needed. About 1,000 more bricks were added to the path, as a donation of services and resources, from Michael Grimm Landscaping and Tree Services.

Grimm, who said the donation was a value of about $6,000, said he and other landscaping association members have helped in the past as well.

“We just saw this as a place where we could make a donation to our community,” Grimm said.

Schoeneck, who said Hope for Bereaved is a not-for-profit organization, said Grimm is both very generous and the best at brick installing.

“It was so nice, so wonderful [of him] to do this for us,” she said.

The organization, which offers 10 different support groups, also prints a monthly newsletter and provides a telephone support line (475-HOPE).

Syracuse University student Samantha Okavaki, an intern at Hope, said she chose to volunteer at Hope because it sounded like a great organization with needs she thought she could fill.

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