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Caz Garden Club sale to feature specialty plants, containers

On Thursday May 19, Cazenovia's Memorial Park will explode with color, as the annual Garden Club Sale celebrates the new planting season. From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. customers can choose perennials from local members' gardens, hanging baskets and annual plants.

A special addition this year is courtesy of a Cazenovia resident and avid gardener, Margaret Clark, who passed away. Her family generously donated all of her wonderful array of garden containers, both large and small, so that we might raise more funds to beautify our village.

To help our customers with selecting both a great container and an exciting blend of unusual annuals, member Nancy Hook has selected proven successful plants from two local nurseries, Brookside Greenhouse and Vollmer Farms and also composed the following guide to achieving a spectacular accent for your home and garden. There will be suggested combinations shown at the sale and any garden club member will assist with your selection.

Success with containers

Three elements combine to make a dramatic collection in pots, window boxes and hanging baskets:

Thrillers: A tall centerpiece, such as evergreens, spikes, grasses, tropical cannas, hibiscus or papyrus, which set the stage for the color palette and tone.

Fillers: Plants that weave throughout the middle ground, matching with or contrasting against the colors of the other plant material, whether foliage or floral. Great mixers are coleus, dusty miller, begonias, angelonia, zonal or scented geraniums and the daisy shapes of osteospermum.

Spillers: Softening the hard edges of planters, these cascading plants of lantana, scaevola, bacopa nasturtium, sweet potato, vinca, helichrysum [licorice plant] and callibrachoa [million bells] add a romantic finishing flourish. Planting them on their side starts the draping effect right away or use a hanging basket's contents, gently taken apart.

10 essential planting pointers

1. Match the size of the pot to the size of material to be grown. Consider shallow pan or tall narrow shapes to decorate tabletops or drab corners.

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