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Pancakes anyone?

It seemed like the entire town met at the Allyn Arena for breakfast on Sunday at the 43rd Annual Skaneateles Rotary Father's Day Pancake Breakfast. A warm, sunny morning was the backdrop as over 3,300 hungry dads and family members lined up and waited their turn for scrambled eggs, sausage and, of course, those tasty pancakes.

"It's our biggest fundraiser," said Rotary member and event chairman Robin Jowaisas. "Everybody comes out for this and attendance this year seems to be on par with last year which is good. The proceeds we raise here all go right back to the community and other Rotary worthy causes such as youth exchange student programs, the community band and American Legion."

The event ran from 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and included 50-50 raffles and other charitable opportunities, which will add to the final total of money raised.

Over 10,000 pancakes were made from 500 pounds of pancake flour mix and topped with 360 bottles of maple syrup; 720 dozen eggs were scrambled along with almost 600 pounds of sausage. To wash it all down there was more than 300 gallons of orange juice, milk and coffee. It all was served by 150 volunteers made up of Rotary members, their friends and family. Scouts provided "trash patrol" to insure spilled food was immediately cleaned up and trash barrels emptied.

"This year we're doing something we haven't done in previous years," added Jowaisas. "We're going green. All of the broken eggshells will go to School House Farms in Borodino for composting, the empty plastic syrup bottle will all be recycled and the cups used for juice and coffee are all compostable."

As the morning progressed and area churches let out, the line-up for food extended out the door. To keep the hungry parents and children entertained while they waited, the Skaneateles Community Band played popular tunes to the delight of children, some of whom danced around the old skating rink floor.

"This is the most fun event we have in town, outside of Labor Day," said past Rotary President, Doug Rutan. "You worry about serving the people fast enough with an all-volunteer team who only do this once a year, you worry about running out of butter or eggs or anything; but then you look at how much fun everyone is having. It's a highly social event and the entire town is here. It's a like a big reunion and everybody knows everybody."

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