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ESM’s Morning Show reaches 3,000, Spartan-style

Morning Show anchor Katie Hall, left, interviews Madeline Chopskie, an East Syracuse Minoa High School and show alum. Chopskie, who is a junior in the Park School of Communication at Ithaca College, was back last week with several other graduates to celebrate the Morning Show's 3000th episide. She will be interning this summer with NBC as park of its Olympics coverage.

Morning Show anchor Katie Hall, left, interviews Madeline Chopskie, an East Syracuse Minoa High School and show alum. Chopskie, who is a junior in the Park School of Communication at Ithaca College, was back last week with several other graduates to celebrate the Morning Show's 3000th episide. She will be interning this summer with NBC as park of its Olympics coverage. Brian Smith

— In a sometimes-serious, sometimes-goofy way, a television family delivered, and celebrated, its 3,000th episode last week, continuing a 19-year run of success, fun and starting careers in the industry.

The Morning Show, part of ESM-TV at East Syracuse-Minoa High School, hit its milestone episode on Thursday, Dec. 22. Dozens of former anchors, producers, directors and cameramen returned to take part in No. 3,000, proof of the gratefulness of the show’s graduates.

So many alumni returned, in fact, that Thursday’s show was moved from the school’s studio to the spacious auditorium. The filming, which is shown daily to the entire school after first block, went smoothly, as a mix of current Spartans and former anchors delivered the news, weather and sports.

Several of the alumni were interviewed by anchor Katie Hall during another segment. Their accolades, internships and current colleges were evidence of how, and why, ESM’s Morning Show has had such a lengthy run.

“It’s so great to see the kids come back. I can’t even put it into words, really,” said Michael Ferris, the teacher in charge of the Morning Show and ESM-TV. He took over in 2002 for Dean Drypolcher, who also attended Thursday’s taping. “I’m very proud of all they’ve done, and I’m really impressed with the group we have here now.

“We know when to be serious, but we also like to have fun, because one of the most important things in television is to know your target audience. What the kids do is important, though. Some of our students are only getting the news from us, so we have a responsibility that we try to uphold each show.”

For Drypolcher, who pushed for and received TVs in each ESM classroom in 1983, No. 3,000 affirmed what he believed since the show started in 1993.

“It was a trendsetter in Central New York at the time, and the administration has continued to update the equipment and give Michael the support he needs to keep it in front of the pack now,” he said. “The kids get a really good handle on television production, and the size and depth of the show allows them to experiment with whatever aspect they’d like.

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