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Fremont Bakery closing after 51 years

Pauline and Tony Fallico, of Manlius, stand in the lobby of the Fremont Bakery. Behind them, family and customers’ wedding photos, including the couple’s, directly to the right of them, in pink.

Pauline and Tony Fallico, of Manlius, stand in the lobby of the Fremont Bakery. Behind them, family and customers’ wedding photos, including the couple’s, directly to the right of them, in pink. Photo by Amanda Seef.

— The traditions and methods have changed when it comes to the cake business. Reality shows like “Cake Boss” and “Ace of Cakes” have changed the idea of traditional wedding cakes, he said.

“People who are doing those cakes are fresh out of art school,” he said.

Recent trends have had some interesting requests file into Fremont Bakery — customers have asked for tiers made of donuts or pies, and many brides have been more inclined to choose cupcakes over the traditional cake.

“We’re not trained for all of that,” Fallico said.

With all of the cakes made, Fallico has had many happy customers — his part in making their special day that much happier. He has an overflowing envelope of thank you cards, spilling across his office desk. More are put away in the upstairs of the bakery.

“I saved all of these,” he said. “How can you get rid of them? You can’t.”

Customers have submitted photos of their weddings, cakes as extravagant and beautiful as the wedding themselves. One wall is full of family wedding photos, including Fallico’s wedding with his bride, Pauline.

Fallico said taking the photos down and packing up the memorabilia from the years — including an extensive Pillsbury Doughboy collection, with a four-foot original styrofoam doughboy in the lobby — could take three or four months. There have been inquiries, but Fallico has no plans to sell the business.

“I don’t know what is going to happen,” he said. “If someone is interested in taking the name, if they do that, I want to make sure they follow my procedures.”

Many of the cakes have been memorialized in photos, like the Capitol building replica made for East Syracuse’s bicentennial, or a cake made for the 30th anniversary of the 174th Fighter Wing. Celebrities, politicians and community members, alike, Fallico said the people are who he will miss.

“I’ve met a lot of people who were part of my growing up in this business,” he said. “The people that I have met are my favorite part.”

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