Quantcast

DeCrow one of 10 named as inductees to Women's Hall of Fame

To coincide with the start of Women's History Month, the National Women's Hall of Fame announces its 2009 Inductees. Included in the group of 10 outstanding American women are world-renowned artist Louise Bourgeois, biochemist Dr. Mildred Cohn, attorney and women's rights activist Karen DeCrow, domestic violence advocate Susan Kelly-Dreiss, attorney and social justice activist Dr. Allie B. Latimer, ecologist and limnologist Dr. Ruth Patrick, and atmospheric scientist Dr. Susan Solomon. These women, along with three historic figures, will be inducted during a weekend of celebration to be held in Seneca Falls, New York on Oct. 10 to 11.

Seneca Falls was the location of the first women's rights convention, held in 1848. The event began a 72-year struggle for women's suffrage.

In announcing the 2009 list, the Hall's Executive Director, Christine M. Moulton, said, "This group of dynamic, intelligent, and accomplished women is a reflection of the very best of America. Overcoming sexism, stereotypical expectations of women, and personal obstacles, each has become a stellar example of greatness in her respective field. We will celebrate these stories and share them with the world as tools for inspiration, innovation and imagination."

The 2009 Inductees are:

Karen DeCrow (1937 - ) A nationally recognized attorney, author and activist, Karen DeCrow is one of the most celebrated leaders of the women's movement. From 1974-1977, she served as the National President of the National Organization for Women (NOW), where she was instrumental in obtaining significant legislative and legal gains and tirelessly advocated on behalf of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA). Ms. DeCrow has written numerous books and articles and has lectured throughout the world on topics such as law, gender equality, and politics. In 1970, she served as National Coordinator of the Women's Strike, and in 1988 she co-founded World Women Watch.

Louise Bourgeois (1911 - ) One of the world's most preeminent artists, Louise Bourgeois's career has spanned over seven decades. Best known for her work as a sculptor, Bourgeois uses a variety of materials including wood, metal, marble and latex to create works often reflective of her childhood experiences and life relationships. In 1982, Bourgeois became the first female artist to be given a retrospective at The Museum of Modern Art in New York, and in 1997 she was awarded the National Medal of Arts. Her varied and extensive body of work has been displayed in the collections of major museums worldwide.

0
Vote on this Story by clicking on the Icon

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment