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St. Joe's accredited as chest pain center

St. Joseph's Hospital Health Center received Chest Pain Center Accreditation from the Society of Chest Pain Centers. St. Joe's is the only hospital in Central New York with this accreditation.

St. Joseph's undertook a rigorous re-evaluation and refinement of heart care processes to integrate the industry's best practices and newest paradigms into its cardiac care services. The hospital's state-of-the-art cardiovascular program works seamlessly with area emergency medical services to ensure that patients get the treatment they need during the critical early stages of a heart attack.

As an Accredited Chest Pain Center, St. Joseph's ensures patients who come to the hospital complaining of chest pain or discomfort are given the immediate treatment necessary to avoid as much heart damage as possible. Protocol-based procedures developed by leading experts in cardiac care to reduce time to treatment in the critical early stages of a heart attack are part St. Joseph's overall cardiac services.

"People tend to wait when they think they might be having a heart attack, and that's a mistake," said Ronald Caputo, MD, cardiologist. "The average patient arrives in the Emergency Department more than two hours after the onset of symptoms, but what they don't know is that the sooner a heart attack is treated, the less damage to the heart and the better the outcome."

It's important for people to know the risk factors and symptoms of heart attack and if they think they're having a heart attack, call 9-1-1.

In addition to Chest Pain Center accreditation, St. Joseph's is the only hospital in Syracuse designated as a Mission Lifeline STEMI hospital by the American Heart Association for its systematic and multidisciplinary approach to treating heart attacks.

Heart Attack Warning Signs

Chest discomfort. Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or that goes away and comes back. It can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain.

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