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Liverpool: Ward won't run again

After serving four two-year terms as mayor of Liverpool, Marlene Ward has decided against running for a fifth term in this year's June 16 village election.

She plans to officially announce her decision at the monthly meeting of the village board of trustees at 7 p.m. Monday Feb. 23, at the Village Hall, 310 Sycamore St.

{Q}"I think it's time,"{Q} she said last week.

Ward, a Republican, was first elected mayor on June 20, 2001, when she defeated Democratic candidate and former Mayor Jon Zappola by a vote of 389 to 172. She ran three more times, each time unopposed, in 2003, 2005 and 2007.

Before becoming mayor, Ward had served for seven years as a village trustee and four years as deputy mayor under then-Mayor Jim Farrell. She had also worked for eight years as Liverpool Village Court clerk, helped establish the Senior Nutrition Center at Salina Town Hall and has served on the boards of the Liverpool Public Library, YMCA, Humane Association of CNY and Liverpool Little League.

She was sworn in as Liverpool's 13th mayor, its first-ever female mayor, on July 1, 2001. Her parents, Ed and Margaret Black who have since passed on, held the Bible as Ward took the oath of office.

Ward, who is in her early-70s, is married to former Salina Town Supervisor Richard "Ace" Ward, and the couple resides at 309 Fourth St.

During her eight years as mayor, the village has accomplished several major projects including a much-needed overhaul of the sanitary sewer system, the adoption of a comprehensive master plan, renovations to Johnson and Washington parks, cemetery improvements and significant street-scaping in the village business district.

In 2002 when Wal-Mart announced its intention to locate a supercenter on Route 57, Ward sprung into action. She lobbied hard against the proposal, chaired public hearings on the subject, wrote letters to town, county and state officials, and in 2006 Ward and the village sued the Salina Town Planning Board, charging that the planners were failing to protect town residents who live in the village from the adverse effects of the traffic increase which a supercenter would cause.

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