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Former anchor Maureen Green talks about her life, then and now

Former TV anchor Maureen Green's start in broadcast journalism began more than 25 years ago as a general assignment reporter at WTVH 5 in Syracuse. After just one year in the news world, she earned the opportunity to join Ron Curtis, an established, admired local personality, at the anchor desk. They worked side by side for 10 years -- both delivering news and touching the hearts of thousands across Central New York. At times, according to syracusepressclub.com, the noon news desk Green shared with the late Ron Curtis earned more than 60 percent of the viewers watching television. Furthermore, throughout the 1980s, WTVH dominated the ratings in local news. But after the birth of her fourth child in 1993, Green was sent packing, she said. She was later welcomed to join the crew at WSYR 9 where she stayed for two years.

In the meantime, audience research proved Channel 5 viewers were still upset at her dismissal, and in turn, a new general manager invited Green to return to her former anchor desk.

"I was there for 11 more wonderful years until last December when another short-term general manager decided I was not what the viewers wanted," Green said.

Yet on Oct. 23, the Syracuse Press Club welcomed four new members to its Wall of Distinction, and Green was among those recognized. The Wall of Distinction honors CNY broadcast and print legends.

Eagle Bulletin/DeWitt Times Editor Tami S. Zimmerman had the chance to follow up with an interview, and asked questions pertaining to Green's life both on and off camera. Here's what she had to say:

When did you first become interested in broadcasting?

I didn't take the usual fervent path to a career. Some of my college classmates knew exactly what they wanted to do and I wondered what was wrong with me for having no idea. It was a process of elimination. I was good at writing and very, very bad at math. At some point during college, I focused on the careers that offered writing opportunities. My early inspiration was Natalie Jacobson at WCVB TV in Boston whom I watched while growing up in Worcester, Mass.

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