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Shake It and Break It'

They may be named the Chicago Hot Six but the band's style is sheer New Orleans.

"We aim for a very old New Orleans sound," says bandleader/trombonist Roy Rubenstein. "That's the music I most enjoy playing and listening to and it's really the most authentic jazz."

The Chicago Hot Six will perform from 3 to 7 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 14, at Le Moyne Manor, 629 Old Liverpool Road, in Liverpool. The concert is hosted by the Jazz Appreciation Society of Syracuse.

Admission costs $10 for JASS members or $12 for non-members. For information, call 469-7034 or 652-0547.

Unusual tunes

A quick glimpse at Hot Six discs shows that the combo eschews evergreens in favor of less-commonplace tunes.

"Right," said Rubenstein, "It's not the usual stuff. We're inclined to play more obscure New Orleans tunes. That's more interesting for the audience and more interesting for us as well."

Some of the sextet's more atypical tunes are the spiritual "Lead Me Savior" and Artie Matthews' 1915 multi-strain ragtime composition "Weary Blues" first recorded in 1919 by Yellow Nunez & The Louisiana Five and often known by its other name "Shake It and Break It."

Other Chicago Hot Six specialties include "Bugle Boy March," a tune based on "The American Soldier," and "Panama Rag" recorded in 1923 by Kid Ory's Creole Orchestra. Every now and then, the Hot Six will jam for six and a half minutes or more on "Special Delivery Blues."

"But never fear," Rubenstein said, "we'll also play some tunes that people are familiar with." Those include numbers such as "Swing That Music" or "Mobile Blues."

Head arrangements

"We lean toward tunes that the audience seems to enjoy," Rubenstein said in a recent telephone interview. "When you're a leader you don't want a totally pre-set idea of what you're going to play. We're always drawing from a much larger repertoire than what you'll actually hear." Then the band tailors its set list to fit the occasion and its listeners.

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